Skip to page content
Workplace RERC


State of the Science Conference
September 15-16, 2005

Conference Home

Telework Opportunities for Workers with Disabilities

Navigate Slides of This Session

Slides Index Slides 1-11 Slides 12-22

Slides On This Page

  1. Computer Adaptations Made for Employees with Disabilities (of those who made adaptations)
  2. Computer Adaptations Made by Type of Disability
  3. Accessibility Training of Employees by Experience Making Computers Accessible
  4. Familiarity with Assistive Technologies/a>
  5. Helpfulness of Organizational Resources to Address Computer / Web Accessibility Questions for Employees with Disabilities
  6. Helpfulness in Removing Technology Barriers
  7. In Summary
  8. Related Cornell University Research Reports
  9. Online Access to Cornell Publications
  10. Further Resources
  11. Contact Information

Slide 1 of 22

Computer Adaptations Made for Employees with Disabilities (of those who made adaptations)

Bar graph:

Note: Percent of all respondents (n=433) excluding "don't know/refused" responses.
Source: Survey of SHRM Membership on IT Access in the Employment Process. Cornell University, 2003


Slide 2 of 22

Computer Adaptations Made by Type of Disability

Pie-chart:

  • Visual accommodation - 65%
  • Wheelchair accommodation - 26%
  • Hearing accommodation - 9%
  • Note: Percent of respondents who made computers accessible for employees with disabilities (n=179).


    Slide 3 of 22

    Accessibility Training of Employees by Experience Making Computers Accessible

    Bar graph: Percent of all respondents (n=433) that train employees in accessibility by experience making computers accessible, excluding "don't know/refused" responses.

      Never Made Computer Accessible Made Computer Accessible
    Employees trained in Internet accessibility for persons with disabilities 8% 28%
    Employees trained in making computers accessible for persons with disabilities 9% 68%

    `Note: Each training program is statistically significant difference at the p= .05 level.
    Source: Survey of SHRM Membership on IT Access in the Employment Process. Cornell University, 2003


    Slide 4 of 22

    Familiarity with Assistive Technologies

    Bar Graph: Percent of all respondents (n=433) who are familiar with various types of assistive technologies, excluding "don't know/refused" responses.
      Familiar (1,2) Neither (3) Unfamiliar (4,5)
    Guidelines for Web design 13% 14%

    73%

    Screen readers 16% 14% 70%
    Braille readers 21% 19% 60%
    Video captioning 25% 20% 55%
    Speech recognition software 32% 23% 45%
    Screen magnifiers 46% 22% 32%
    Source: Survey of SHRM Membership on IT Access in the Employment Process. Cornell University, 2003


    Slide 5 of 22

    Helpfulness of Organizational Resources to Address Computer / Web Accessibility Questions for Employees with Disabilities

    Bar Graph: Percent of all respondents (n=433) who report that various organizational resources to address computer/web accessibility are helpful, excluding "don't know/refused" responses.
      Helpful (1,2) Neither (3) Not helpful (4,5)
    Procurement office staff
    35% 24% 41%
    Central HR staff 60% 20% 20%
    Disability case management staff 66% 16% 18%
    Computer / network services staff 66% 21% 12%

    Health and safety / ergonomics staff
    72% 16% 12%
    The employees with disabilities themselves 84% 9% 7%

    Source: Survey of SHRM Membership on IT Access in the Employment Process. Cornell University, 2003


    Slide 6 of 22

    Helpfulness in Removing Technology Barriers

    Bar Graph: Percent of all respondents (n=433) who report that various resources and strategies to remove technology barriers are helpful, excluding "don't know/refused" responses.
      Helpful (1,2) Neither (3) Not helpful (4,5)
    Training purchasing or procurement specialists in Internet access issues for people with disabilities 55% 27%
    18%
    Print information on Internet accessibility 61% 25% 15%
    Telephone or e-mail expert consultation on Internet accessibility 66% 21% 13%
    Web based resource on Internet/computer accessibility 70% 20% 10%
    Computer training for potential employees with disabilities 71% 13%
    15%
    Uniform guidelines to make Web-based employer processes accessible 73% 16% 12%
    Trained technical staff within your organization 73% 15% 11%
    Specific expertise or technical assistance on technology accessibility issues in your organization 74% 16% 10%

    Source: Survey of SHRM Membership on IT Access in the Employment Process. Cornell University, 2003


    Slide 7 of 22

    In Summary

  • IT applications are increasing at a rapid rate
  • Few IT applications are accessible to people with disabilities
  • This poses a significant educational and employment barrier

  • Slide 8 of 22

    Related Cornell University Research Reports

    Bruyere, S., & Erickson, W. (2001). E-Human resources: A review of the literature and implications for people with disabilities. Ithaca: NY: Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Extension Division, Program on Employment and Disability.

    Bruyere, S., Erickson, W., & Schramm, J. (2003). Disability in a technology-driven workplace. Workplace Visions.

    Bruyere, S., Erickson, E., & VanLooy, S. (2005). Information technology and the workplace: Implications for persons with disabilities. Disability Studies Quarterly, 25(2).

    Bruyere, S., Erickson, W., & VanLooy, S. (2003). Accessible IT for people with disabilities: HR considerations. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations Extension Division, Employment and Disability Institute.

    Bruyere, S., Erickson, W., & VanLooy, S. (2003). Employment and disability policy: the role of the psychologist. Rehabilitation Psychology, 45(3) 312-313.

    Erickson, W. (2002). A review of selected e-recruiting websites: Disability accessibility considerations. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations Extension Division, Employment and Disability Institute.

    Copies of Cornell University reports on which this presentation is in part based, are available from the authors by email: Susanne M. Bruyére, smb23@cornell.edu & William A. Erickson, wae1@cornell.edu



    Slide 9 of 22

    Online Access to Cornell Publications

    http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/edicollect/.


    Slide 10 of 22

    Further Resources

    ADA Disability and Business Technical Assistance (DBTAC)/ ADA &IT Centers
    1-800-949-4232 (Voice/TTY); www.adata.org/

    Employment and Disability Institute

  • Copies of the full research report can be downloaded at www.ilr.cornell.edu/ped/surveyresults.html
  • Resources on accommodations for HR Professionals available at www.hrtips.org
  • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    (800) 669-4000 (voice); (800) 669-6820 (TTY); www.eeoc.gov

    National Council on Disability
    Publications on the Americans with Disabilities Act available at www.ncd.gov

    Information Technology Accessibility Information

  • Federal technology accessibility guidelines -- www.section508.gov
  • World Wide Web Consortium – www.wc3.org

  • Slide 11 of 22

    Contact Information

    Susanne M. Bruyere, PhD
    smb23@cornell.edu

    Employment and Disability Institute, Cornell University
    School of Industrial and Labor Relations
    201 ILR Extension Building
    Ithaca, New York 14853

    Telephone: 607.255.7727
    Fax: 607.255.2763
    ilr_edi@cornell.edu
    www.edi.cornell.edu



    Top of Page