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State of the Science Conference
September 15-16, 2005

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Universal Design in Telecommunications: Putting Practice into Policy

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Slides Index Slides 1-10 Slides 11-20 Slides 21-30 Slides 31-39

Slides On This Page

  1. Accessibility Guidelines
  2. Accessibility Guidelines
  3. Policy Implementation Issues
  4. Policy Implementation Issues
  5. Policy Implementation Issues
  6. Universal Design Approach
  7. Universal Design Approach
  8. Design Guidelines
  9. Cost-Benefit Analysis
  10. Cost-Benefit Analysis

Slide 11 of 39

Accessibility Guidelines


Slide 12 of 39

Accessibility Guidelines

Output-related functions:

  • prevention of visually induced seizures
  • availability of auditory cutoff
  • noninterference with hearing technologies
  • hearing aid coupling

  • Slide 13 of 39

    Policy Implementation Issues

  • Compatibility with peripheral devices is not required as a minimum level of access
  • Who was this policy written for?

  • Slide 14 of 39

    Policy Implementation Issues

  • Equipment and services should be accessible and usable if readily achievable
  • Or equipment and services should be compatible with peripheral devices if “readily achievable”

  • Slide 15 of 39

    Policy Implementation Issues

  • Provides discretionary access
  • Creates opportunity costs in marketability
  • Promotes short-sided view of profitability
  • Provides no incentives to exploit new technologies

  • Slide 16 of 39

    Universal Design Approach

    A process that provides access to products and services for as broad a range of people as possible without the need for assistive devices or where this is not possible the product or service is at least compatible with the use of assistive devices


    Slide 17 of 39

    Universal Design Approach

    User interface design process considers:

  • Usability goals
  • User characteristics
  • Environment
  • Tasks
  • Workflow

  • Slide 18 of 39

    Design Guidelines

  • Useful and marketable
  • Accommodates preferences and abilities
  • Easy to understand
  • Effectively communicates information
  • Minimizes hazards
  • Minimizes fatigue
  • Size and space are appropriate

  • Slide 19 of 39

    Cost-Benefit Analysis


    Slide 20 of 39

    Access Feature Solutions: Vision Impairment

  • Any-button answer
  • Controls grouped by function
  • Keys identifiable by touch
  • Nib on ‘5’ key
  • Speech recognition controls
  • Speech synthesis announcement of functions, status
  • Tones indicating functions, status
  • Variable or composable signal tones

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