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Workplace RERC


State of the Science Conference
September 15-16, 2005

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Slides Index Slides 1-14 Slides 15-27

Slides On This Page

  1. WI DVR Surveys - Purpose
  2. WI DVR Surveys - Components
  3. WI DVR Surveys - The 3 Surveys
  4. WI DVR Surveys - In Progress
  5. Conclusions
  6. Recommendations for Future Development
  7. Questions?
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Additional Authors/Researchers
  10. References
  11. Presentation Abstract
  12. Presenter Options: Universal Access Features
  13. Presenter Options: Viewing Speaker Notes

Slide 15 of 27

WI DVR Surveys - Purpose

  • New instruments and data

    Dual Purpose:

  • Improve rehabilitation technology services
  • Advances in AT outcomes measurement
  • Reasonably large sample size with more specifics than RSA-911

  • Slide 16 of 27

    WI DVR Surveys – Components

  • AT outcomes data in VR = Case records + VR counselors + consumers + (service providers & vendors)
  • Data from only one source?
  • How could data be linked together to yield better outcomes info?

  • Slide 17 of 27

    WI DVR Surveys – The 3 Surveys

  • Counselors – Web
  • Training/experience – General and RT
  • RT roles and referral types/frequency
  • Experiences availability and with RT and RT providers
  • Consumers – Phone
  • Relative contributions
  • Attitudes
  • Devices used, including non-VR
  • Sources of devices/services
  • Providers (services and devices) – Mail
  • Area served
  • Services
  • Team members and approach
  • Referral & funding sources

  • Slide 18 of 27

    WI DVR Surveys – In Progress

  • Data collection in progress
  • Contact the ATOMS Project or stay tuned to www.atoms.uwm.edu for more info and results

  • Slide 19 of 27

    Conclusions

  • This is just one portion of one model/setting.
  • Large scale AT outcomes system presents huge challenges depending on inter-agency collaboration, application of new concepts, analyses of large and intertwined databases.
  • Lots of hoops to jump through, especially when data isn’t in one place.

  • Slide 20 of 27

    Recommendations for Future Development

  • Maintain a big picture database like the RSA-911 even though it may not include the details of RT and worksite accommodations. Consider breaking out RT components again.
  • Closely consider legal and privacy implications in developing systems.
  • Develop standardized follow-up and integrated intervention systems.
  • Develop a viable categorization & coding system for devices and interventions (technology changes more rapidly than the systems can accommodate or anticipate).

  • Slide 21 of 27

    Questions?

    A male and a female cartoon character alternate between saying, “Pick me! Pick me!” and “No, pick me!” respectively, in response to the request for questions.

    This slide was inspired by a vibrant young gentleman at an equipment work day who was very creative and entertaining in advertising that he should be the one who should be selected to receive the last brownie from the pan, even though he had already had a week’s worth of sugar that morning.


    Slide 22 of 27

    Acknowledgements

    The Assistive Technology Outcomes Measurement System (ATOMS) Project (atoms.uwm.edu) is a highly collaborative effort based at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee and is funded in part by NIDRR under Project H133A010403. Portions of this work have also been funded by the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR).


    Slide 23 of 27

    Additional Authors/Researchers

  • Laura Owens, Ph.D. UW-Milwaukee
  • Al Noll, UW-Stout
  • Bobbi Johnson, UW-Milwaukee & UW-Madison

  • Slide 24 of 27

    References

    United States Department of Education (1995, May 1). Policy directive: RSA-PD-95-04. Retrieved May 10, 2004, from http://www.ed.gov/offices/OSERS/RSA/guidance/PD-95-04.pdf.

    United States Department of Education (2000, March 16). Policy directive: RSA-PD-00-06. Retrieved May 10, 2004, from http://www.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/rsa/pd-00-06.pdf.

    United States Department of Education (2000, April 17). Policy directive: RSA-PD-00-07. Retrieved May 10, 2004, from http://www.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/rsa/pd-00-07.pdf



    Slide 25 of 27

    Presentation Abstract

    How does AT contribute to VR services and how effective is it compared to other concurrent or alternative interventions? What data is already being collected? How do you analyze the data? The ATOMS Project has partnered with Wisconsin DVR to develop and deliver several surveys and conduct AT outcomes analyses to help tackle the complex problems that create barriers to providing answers to these seemingly simple questions. This project investigates both historical data from existing systems and new data generated from the consumer, counselor, and provider surveys created specifically for this study.

    This brief presentation describes the surveys and analyses, discusses sample survey questions, and explains some preliminary data. Challenges in data collection, analysis, and use of data/information will also be discussed. Of the four common models (medical, educational, vocational, and independent living) that people with disabilities experience and that ATOMS considers, this presentation focuses on the vocational model.

    The results of this work have the potential to help guide the micro and macro decisions that service providers and administrators make related to AT in work. The team is also investigating the legal implications of how “evidence” produced by such studies might be used by different stakeholders in both positive and negative ways.

    The Assistive Technology Outcomes Measurement System (ATOMS) Project (atoms.uwm.edu) is a highly collaborative effort based at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee and is funded in part by NIDRR under Project H133A010403. Portions of this work have also been funded by the Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR).


    Slide 26 of 27

    Presenter Options: Universal Access Features

  • The “speaker notes” function in PowerPoint is used as a universal access feature.
  • The speaker notes contain long text descriptions of the graphics, because it was not feasible to do this with PowerPoint’s ALT text function to provide access for people with disabilities, including vision and cognitive impairments.
  • The notes can also be used to prepare a presenter for delivering the slides.
  • Where graphics repeat, the descriptions for graphics only describe what has changed from the previous slide.
  • Unfortunately, current versions of the free PowerPoint Viewer do not support “speaker notes.”

  • Slide 27 of 27

    Presenter Options: Viewing Speaker Notes

  • Using the “Slide Show” view
  • In Windows, right click on the slide in use or use the context key to bring up the menu, and then select “speaker notes”
  • On a Mac, using Ctrl + Click on the slide and select “speakers notes” from the menu.
  • The notes can also be seen as a part of the “Normal” view or directly by using the “Notes Page” view.
  • When in “Normal” view, F6 can be used to switch between the slide, notes, and outline panes respectively.

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